Why Anzac Day Means so Much to Me

The last week has been pretty hard for me. I moved my website to another website host and, to cut a long story short, I lost most of Midlifestylist.com. Six months of work down the drain.

It’s really devastating and I felt like giving up, but my son gave me a pep talk last night which encouraged me to keep going. He’s a musician, music and video editor and music technician and he’s had his full share of devastating losses like this – one of his hard-drives burnt out and he lost a whole year of work a few years ago. I feel terrible because people who clicked on a link to my site got an error message, I apologise for this if it has happened to you.

The good news is, I have been able to move my website back to the original place and it seems to have been restored just the way I had it before! Enormous relief.

Anyway, I wanted to commemorate Anzac Day today. Anzac Day is a Public Holiday in Australia and New Zealand to remember our Service men and women who served in the Armed Forces. With great respect we hold dawn vigils and ceremonies in honour of these amazing people. This year was different because of Covid-19 – social distancing meant that we couldn’t gather at ceremonies so we stood on our driveways with a candle instead.

In honour of my grandfather who served in World War One, I published his story in my blog about my family history, This is Who We Are. You can read it here. It is his memoirs of his time spent serving in France for the British Army – he went to war at age 18 and spent 5 years in the front lines in Ypres, Somme and Maubeuge in many of the bloodiest battles of World War One.


Harold Norris, Private 16471 of the 18th King’s Liverpool Regiment of the British Army from 1914 – 1919. Served in WW1 in Somme, Ypres and Maubeuge in France

I also Honour my Father-in-Law Ces Henry who served with the Australian Army in Korea. He doesn’t like to talk about his time spent overseas serving our country, but we know that he was on the front lines there and conditions were particularly horrendous for them.


Cecil Henry, my father-in-law with Gwen, my mother-in-law. Cec served in the Australian Army in Korea and other overseas posts including in Japan after the war.

My sister’s son Xavier is carrying on the family tradition and is serving with the Australian Army at the present time. I’m very proud of him – his mother unfortunately passed away after years of being unwell so he overcame a lot growing up. He was deployed in Iraq for some time last year.


Xavier my nephew (far left) who serves in the Australian Army

They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:

Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn,

At the going down of the the sun and in the morning,

We will remember them.

Lest we forget

Laurence Binyon, For the Fallen, September 1914

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